About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
KNTV (NBC) 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
and her personal struggles. >>> on the front lines. of the new secretary of defense in afghanistan with a striking new assessment of al qaeda. >>> final edition for a tabloid caught up in its own scandal. is there more to come? >>> and royal treatment. will and kate bring their charming style to the u.s. carrying on a long family tradition. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. betty ford, a former dancer, stay-at-home mom of four, and wife of a michigan congressman, never could have imaged the strange circumstances that in 1974 would land her and her husband, gerald ford, into the white house, but for a role she was unprepared for, first lady of the united states, she made a lot of it and changed thousands if not millions of lives in the process. betty ford died last night in california at the age of 93. she was known for speaking her mind, even when it didn't jive with her husband's political agenda, but she is best remembered for putting a public face to some awfully personal struggles and inspiring americans, particularly women, in ways no other first
media empire. stephanie gosk, nbc news, london. >>> in afghanistan tonight a lot of unanswered questions about the shocking assassination of president hamid karzai's half-brother. a man who was also a powerful figure in his own right, shot in cold blood at his home by a trusted associate. we have the story from kabul. >> reporter: hi, ann. ahmed wali karzai, he was lured and killed in his home by a trusted security guard and confidant named sardar muhammad. out of a meeting and shot in cold blood. he was shot and killed by other security guards. he used the trust to lure him out of a meeting and shoot him in cold blood. he was also shot and killed by other security guards. the taliban have claimed responsibility saying they had been working with the killer for, quote, some time." awk was an infamous power broker in kandahar province, a key province and the spiritual home of the taliban and considered to be a part of the drug trade but u.s. and nato officials say they needed him, a stabilizing figure in an otherwise unstable region. his death leaves behind a power vacuum and is considered
his last fourth of july as commander of the u.s. forces in afghanistan. he met with american troops in the war zone, and just two weeks before heading home to take on his new job as cia director, he spoke one on one with nbc about america's mission. >> happy fourth of july to all of you. >> reporter: it's his eighth fourth of july in a combat zone, but the last in uniform for general david petraeus. he spent the day visiting some of the thousands of u.s. troops stationed in afghanistan. a farewell tour for a general many consider a rock star who found himself asking these tough as nails troops to just relax. >> the best way to relax is to put your hands in your pockets. that means you right there. go ahead. in fact, i'll put them in my pockets, too, here. >> reporter: credited with helping turn the iraq war around, petraeus was tapped by president obama a year ago to do the same in afghanistan. he admits it hasn't been easy. >> i never felt we could flip afghanistan the way we were able to flip iraq. >> reporter: a tough situation, but he insists not hopeless. >> the situation here
, nbc news, oslo, norway. >>> as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops from afghanistan, another setback to report tonight. a suicide bombing has killed the mayor of kandahar, afghanistan's second largest city. the mayor who, by the way, was a dual afghan-u.s. citizen was killed when an assassin detonated explosives hidden in his turban as the mayor met with tribal elders. >>> we have been reporting this week on the famine affecting millions in the horn of africa. today, a plane carrying the first airlift of urgently needed nutritional supplements landed in somalia. the shipment will be distributed to medical facilities to help starving children. >>> when we come back, the troubled life and far too early death of an olympian we got to know in vancouver. speedy as he was, he couldn't outrun his demons. >>> and later, closing the doors of an american institution after more than 100 years. >>> the games will be ready. the taxis will be ready. and all of the people of london will be ready to welcome the world's finest athletes to the greatest games that have ever been held in the greatest ci
. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato led troops to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research on head injuries and dementia and alzheimer's and a group that the researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>>, and later, they may have come up short in the end, but the u.s. women's world cup team members are still american idols. >>> we're back, as promised, with news that may help solve a mystery. researchers set out to see what happened later in life to those americans who served in vietnam. what they found, presented today at the annual meeting of the alzheimer's association, is that head injuries during that war may be linked to dementia years later. and the findings could mean a frightening scenario, of course, for veterans of our current dual wars. thousands of them have come h
for the freedoms we all enjoy. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan. in tonight's "making a difference" report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars, and have joined forces now to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> ready, set, go! >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own heal
who died in afghanistan in 2006 may not only have had his cell phone hacked into by news of the world, but also his e-mail. >> they have hacked into a dead soldier, it's despicable. what else would you say? what on earth did they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in the words of the prime minister, people trust the police to protect them, politicians to represent them and the press to inform them. and says the british public has been failed by all three. michelle kosinski, nbc news, london. >>> in the middle east where fridays are typically the biggest day for protests, following friday prayers, hundreds of thousands were out on the streets of syria again today demanding regime change. and in egypt, protesters are back in the streets, back in tahrir square. it's been five months now since mubarak was forced out, since we were there to cover it. there was so much hope back then, but there's now growing anger over the slow pace of change and growing concern about who holds the power. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel finds himself back in tahrir square once again t
panetta has been to iraq and afghanistan before but never as defense secretary, that happened this weekend, he's only been on the job for 11 days and already those traveling with him say there's been an unmistakable change at the top at the pentagon. our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski is traveling with him and tonight has an exclusive interview with the secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta surveyed iraq from a u.s. military helicopter today and was troubled by the landscape below. u.s. forces here, set to withdraw by the end of the year, are once again caught up in a war. 15 troops were killed last month by roadside bombs. panetta told a gathering of soldiers today the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure that we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military forces out to hunt down the attackers. in an interview with nbc news, panetta suggested if not, american combat forces would do the job. >> all i can tell you is i do have the
soldiers who are in iraq and afghanistan. but that could send shivers through our credit markets, not just here but around the world as the u.s. has had a huge loss in confidence. that could end up with major concessions. so if you borrow from your credit cards to buy a dishwasher, a car, or send your kids to school, that's going to become much, much more expensive. at the same time, the government has all this borrowing on its books and it has to pay interest on it. those interest payments would grow immensely if we were to have any kind of default or anything close to it here in the u.s. and there's no reason we should be talking about making it harder for american families to pay its bills or for the government to pay its bills. when it's already difficult enough. >> and later we'll look at how the budget issues in some states are threatening summer. that's later on in tonight's broadcast. >>> another chapter is in the books in the widely watched saga of casey anthony following all the hubbub this week after she was found not guilty of murdering her daughter, this was sentencing day and
-olds all have a parent who has done multiple tours in iraq or afghanistan. so guess what they like best about the women's team? >> they don't give up. >> reporter: it's their hallmark says espn analyst judy fuady, a member of the 1999 team. >> to show courage and the will to persevere when everything is against you will be their legacy if they can win this game on sunday. >> reporter: but the americans have already achieved one big victory. they're regarded not just as world class women's players, but world class soccer players, period. >> the women are now being appreciated for their skill as athletes. >> reporter: skills they hope will bring home the cup. nbc news, frankfurt. >>> that's "nbc nightly news" for this saturday. i'm lester holt reporting from new york. see you tomorrow morning on "today" and right back here tomorrow evening. "today" and right back here tomorrow evening. good night. captions paid for by nbc-universal television
petrie, six tours in afghanistan, two in iraq, a married father of four, awarded the nation's highest military honor by saving the lives of fellow troopers by picking up a live grenade and throwing its which cost him his hand and much of his forearm. this photo received wide circulation around the country today, it's the president, shaking his new prosthetic hand yesterday at the white house. so we wanted to show you a clip from our exclusive interview with sergeant petrie to show you how matter of fact he is about the new hand, which he loves to play with and talk about and demonstrate. that's a handsome hand. >> it's wonderful. when i lost it, i thought i was going to have a hook, which i was content with. i mean i was happy the way i lost my hand, but nevertheless, nobody wants to lose a hand. >> shake my hand with that. >> oh, yes. >> tell me how it feels for you. >> for me it feels like a normal handshake. it uses the same muscles that i would to open and close. it's no change from what i did before. it took me a couple of hours to learn how to use it. >> if you haven't caught on
in afghanistan, after the murder of his half brother this week, the afghan brother hamid karzai, overcome with grief, climbed in his own brother's freshly dug grave, sobbing uncontrollably. >>> this week marked the 100th anniversary of the time when a guy landed a plane on the white house lawn, something they frown upon these days. >>> chicagoans this week have someone new to look up to. the massive marilyn monroe. it's the work of the famous sculptor sue ber sewer johnson. >>> and we lost a voice this week that reminded a lot of us of the good old days. ♪ i'm going to tell the world that i love you ♪ >> while way too many teenagers sang it erroneously on the car radio, the vocalist was rob grill of the grass roots. he died this week at the age of 67. less well known, the fact that the lead guitarist on that song was creed bratton, the guy who plays creed on "the office" on nbc. and that was a surprise to a lot of people in our office at nbc. so we all learned something this week. >>> and that ends the week on a friday night in new york. thank you for being here with us for all of it.
, but that includes predicted savings from wars in iraq and afghanistan. at a speech today, the president walked the middle ground. >> neither party is blameless for the decisions that led to our debt. but both parties have a responsibility to come together and solve the problem. >> reporter: and one of the big issues for democrats is they say the republican plan would sort of expire before the president's re-election campaign, with another vote to raise the debt ceiling again, they say that would put us right back here. republicans say they need to guarantee that cuts would actually happen in the future to prevent more of a crisis. now, after all this wrangling, aides tell me the senior level negotiators in both parties are still talking, trying to find a way to close the gaps. and as you mentioned, brian, speaker boehner will follow the president tonight. he'll speak for about five minutes to lay out why he thinks his plan should get the public support. brian? >> kelly o'donnell setting the stage on capitol hill for us tonight. kelly, thanks. >>> our chief white house correspondent political d
, saying he wanted to get even with the military for the fighting in iraq and afghanistan. investigators say his targets were fellow soldiers at the army's sprawling ft. hood. texas police revealed today they arrested naser jason abdo yesterday at a motel near ft. hood. in his room, atf agents found enough explosives to make at least two timebombs. the police chief called abdo very dangerous. >> i can tell you that we would probably be here today giving you a different briefing had he not been stopped. >> reporter: in fact, federal officials say abdo planned to set off bombs today, just outside the army post. it was a tip from the owner of this gun store that led to his arrest. they believe abdo was acting suspiciously, asking too many questions. it's the same store where investigators say army major hassan bought the gun used in the 2009 shootings at ft. hood. last year while stationed in kentucky, abdo asked to be classified a conscientious objective. >> if you feel being in the military, goes against your conscience, use this army regulation, because that's what it's here for. >> repo
's 170th infantry brigade in afghanistan held its breath on every kick. while around the world, this was the cheer. >> usa! usa! >> usa! >> reporter: in new york's times square. >> they've got the guys rocking the women's jerseys. it feels really good. >> reporter: suburban los angeles. >> i look up to every single one of them. >> reporter: and this frankfurt sports bar where ex-pats and tourists stood for the national anthem. in the twitter verse, thousands of fans tweeted support including justin timberlake, lance armstrong and president obama who watched the game with his family. while in frankfurt, dr. jill biden and chelsea clinton represented the white house. a former soccer mom herself -- >> you must be so excited! >> reporter: -- biden thanked the parents of the team. >> it's the moms and the dads who are behind their children and who get them to where they are today. >> reporter: it was not the ending america hoped for. but for some, it was still satisfying. >> whoever wins, i'll be happy, to be honest. >> reporter: now, japan won the cup and plenty of hearts here in g
street to the battlefields of afghanistan. as the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, discovered for himself today, nbc's jim miklaszewski is traveling with him. >> reporter: here at the hot spots of kandahar, american soldiers and marines are still dodging bullets, rockets and road side bombs every day. amazingly, when they had a cc1: chance to throw questions at the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, their number one concern was the ongoing debate back home over the debt ceiling. >> the checkbook is not unlimited. >> reporter: admiral mullen told soldiers at kandahar that if the talks failed they'd still have to fight but they might not get paid. >> there are plenty of you that are living paycheck to paycheck: so if paychecks were to stop, it can have a devastating impact, and it can have a devastating impact pretty quickly. >> reporter: at camp leatherneck, mullen told marines given the state of the u.s. economy, all the services face a cutback in the size of the force, and maybe even military benefits. >> we're going to have to tigh
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)